Milano Design Week

Milan, 17-22.april.2011

Luce Tempo Luogo

The Japanese multinational, which participated for the third time in the "Milano Design Week", presented its new generation of LED lighting at the "Luce Tempo Luogo" exhibition staged in the Tortona zone. At this edition, Toshiba collaborated with the DGT (Dorell.Ghotmeh.Tane/Architects) practice and Izumi Okayasu, lighting designer. The "Cortile di Via Savona", an old factory where the walls are the only element still standing, was the venue chosen for the event owing to its unique characteristics, its history and its significance within the urban fabric. The installation, which combined the concepts of light, time and place, was divided into three highly differentiated spaces: Entrance, Courtyard and Interior. To access the installation, visitors had to cross a white tunnel with a fine line of light that extended along the ceiling and was reflected in a thread of water on the floor, thus forming another line of light. Once past the tunnel the courtyard was entered, where the Sun illuminated the waves on the water's surface during the day and the LEDs did this at night. These waves were in turn reflected on one of the factory walls, creating original luminous effects. In the last space, visitors walked along a corridor delimited by water curtains illuminated by a large number of LEDS. The play between the light and the sound of falling drops enveloped the visitor in a pleasant sensation of freshness in a relaxing atmosphere.

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Neoreal Wonder

At this edition of the Neoreal Wonder project, Canon chose the Torafu Architects team and the Wow visual design studio to materialise the concept of "coexistence of airiness and revolution"). The sensibility and style of both Japanese practices gave rise to a spectacular visual experience in which light and images interacted with the space; dust particles suspended in the air mingled with the radial light projection and images to give shape to this light. A spectacle that was only made possible by 25 Canon projectors and the "luminous flux screen", a conical-shaped screen that consisted of an innumerable levelling string of light rays 0.5 mm in diameter and 15.3 m long to trace the shape of radially extended light. The original images projected in the installation were taken with a Canon digital video camera and an SLR camera. This work has allowed visitors to experiment the new possibilities offered by images.

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Multiple uses for a techno-surface

DuPont™ Corian® and Disney® presented at the Padiglione Visconti the exhibition "TRON designs Corian®, inspiried in the film "TRON: Legacy". The set was designed by using the DuPont™ Corian® techno-surface and basically centred on three scenes and elements from the film: the "Flynn's Arcade", the "Light Cycle" and the "Safe House". The exhibition also featured a show of large-format images from "TRON: Legacy" and the presentation of all the companies and designers that took part in it, displaying their novelties to provide the world of furniture and design with a source of creativity and innovation through interior design solutions and architectural shapes inspired in "TRON: Legacy" and exploiting the versatility of the techno-surface.

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OLED technology

An exhibition held at the Design Library and created by the lighting designer Satoshi Uchihara showed the first colour-adjustable organic LED (OLED) luminous panels devised for large formats. They are based on a unique materials technology developed by Verbatim's head company, Mitsubishi Chemical Holding Group. The project was presented in a dark room lined with mirrors reflecting the great luminous structures composed of multiple cubes made from panels with OLED technology. The adjustable colours and the white hue of the Verbatim OLEDs, VELVE, permit modifying the atmosphere in a space in order to adapt it to its function at any given time: from brilliant cold lighting devised for a working space to a warm soft light that invites us to relax. Designed for general lighting, furniture lighting and other applications, they stand out for their high efficiency, with light emission of 28 lumens per watt at 1,000 cd/m2 and very precise colour performance (high CRI). In order to simplify the work development, Verbatim offers two products: a sample kit for lighting engineers containing an OLED that can be used to evaluate seven pre-programmed saturated colours, one in an adjustable white hue and variable function and an OLED module incorporating a printed circuit that provides a standard DMX interface for controlling RGB colour and a DALI interface for adjusting the white tone.

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Light in Progress

Second edition of Light-in-progress organised by iGuzzini, an event where the questions More Light? Less Light? Better Light! gave rise to an intense debate that questioned and discussed the ways in which the city can be illuminated, save energy and, above all, illuminate better. While during the first edition the dominant question was "Can we light better at less cost?", on this occasion what predominated were projects to give shape to these ideas. Through a virtual journey with Google Earth Pro, iGuzzini guided the spectators through the discovery of four cities, the lighting solutions created expressly for them and the four international teams of designers, architects and lighting designers that have devised them: Turin, at the Venarie Reale, where a sophisticated lighting system designed by Michele De Lucchi illuminates the square situated in front of the historic palace, Hamburg, where the special Ex – Centric luminaire designed by Studio&Partners in collaboration with the lighting designer Tom Scholotfeldt redeveloped the Mönckebergstrasse, the principal historic and commercial artery of the city, L'Aquila, with the System 4in1 lighting systems designed by Nothing Studio for the area leading to the new and experimental "Church of the Resurrection", Beaune, in the heart of vineyard France, where the reinterpretation of the historic centre has become the backbone of a lighting project that encompasses the whole city. In order to exalt this protagonist role reserved to lighting, Light-in-progress produced an astonishing montage: a sort of box with surfaces and walls coloured by the light emitted by the urban lighting systems hanging from the ceiling, projecting light beams upwards instead of downwards. This was definitely an unconventional light distribution where the visitor found himself in a position usually occupied by the celestial canopy, thus experiencing the total absence of glare caused by the light flow.

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